native, water-wise gardens
Before & After Testimonials Colleen's garden Links

 

Before

Long ago, this concrete walkway led to a barbeque pit in this old South Austin yard. The homeowners wanted to keep the “feel” of their park-like space while making it feel more cohesive and contemporary.

After

Circles were a unifying theme, so we transformed the concrete pad into a circle and made it the focal point it was always meant to be with a simple, elegant pot.

Before

This circle bed rests outside a favored view in the homeowner’s sunroom. It seemed to beg for a water feature.

After

Again, we highlighted the circle shape and filled it with a palette of purples and blue plants that would thrive in the dappled light. And of course, showcased the fountain, which the bees seem to love.

Before

A very small courtyard in a condo had some great elements of wood and brick, but needed a pick-me-up for this homeowner who loved color.

After

Painted pots with bullet-proof plants, a recycled plastic rug and a painted mirror created a fun space immediately.

Before

Here's a challenge: an apartment complex near UT that demanded a no-maintenance solution but still needed a community space tenants could enjoy.

After

The clean look of pavers with gravel met everyone’s needs: management, tenants, and neighbors.

Before

This darling, newly remodeled home has a small front yard. The beautiful old oaks were lost in overgrown weeds and ligustrum. And because it is a rental, plants had to be super low maintenance.

After

We redesigned the walkway to emphasize the home's welcoming entrance. Generous areas of compost and mulch showcase the oaks, while shade-loving, drought-tolerant, evergreen perennials complete the picture.

Before

An active residential intersection, this corner was a real eyesore to the neighborhood's many cyclists and walkers..

After

By adding a bit of height with a berm, the corner now feels like an entrance to the neighborhood. The berm is covered with purple and pink natives, designed to provide interest year-round. Permaculture principles were employed to keep rainwater on the property.

Before

This charming historic home, complete with a white picket fence, lacked a landscape design that complimented the house..

After

By widening and redesigning the beds, we reduced grass while enhancing the home's curb appeal with drought tolerant "old fashioned" plants that could have been planted 100 years ago.

Before

We wanted to keep as much existing plant and rock material as we could on the property.

After

So we reorganized, creating a winding path with the existing rock, and opening up the base of the trees with compost and mulch.

Before

There's a reason the grassy area between the street and the sidewalk is called "devil's strip." And in Hyde Park, these areas are 8 ft. deep, and solutions seem expensive and unsatisfying.

After

Using a method called sheet mulching, we laid down corrugated cardboard and covered it with mulch. This approach kills the weeds without digging or chemicals. Over time, the cardboard decomposes. Trees are cared for, irrigation is unnecessary and maintenance is minimal. The rocks are an added touch.